A brand is essentially the personality and identity of your business. It is what forms the first impression of your business for potential customers and encompasses how it looks and sounds. It is how the market identifies your business compared to your competitors and will hopefully make you stand out. Components of a brand can include:

  • Name
  • Logo
  • Tagline
  • Tone of voice
  • Fonts & typography
  • Symbols
  • Features
  • Colours
  • Graphical element
  • Niche
  • Experience
  • Or anything that identifies individual businesses’ product or service as unique or distinct 

Branding is the process of creating a brand. It is important as it involves clearly positioning your company or product in the market, devising a brand strategy, possibly creating your name, defining your company’s tone of voice and designing corporate and/or product identity.
Using water as an example, how do several companies around the world sell the same product and convince the market to purchase their water over their competitors? The simple answer: a great brand!

Think about this as an example, San Pellegrino has positioned itself as a luxury brand and is usually what is served at a 5 star fine dining restaurant, where as Mount Franklin in comparison, has branded itself as accessible and affordable and is found in so many outlets. Still keeping on the water examples, some brands market their features to encourage people to buy them – you might buy a bottle of Pump for sport as their bottles features a pop top for ease or you might buy a bottle of Antipodes or VOSS for their trendy glass bottles. All of these brands have a purpose and takes into consideration their niche and/or target markets, this is what makes a good brand!

Personal branding is the process of using online and offline tactics to market yourself individually as a professionally. Digital media has helped create an emphasis on personal branding for all types of hiring and purchase decisions.

Once you have a fully researched content calendar which meets the business objectives and includes your keywords, good content marketing includes creating original content which is thought-provoking, memorable and engaging – rich with images and videos.

Brand recognition means more than receiving name mentions in front of potential customers; it’s about cultivating the desired perception and understanding of your brand among key audiences. 

A benchmark assessment will help you measure and understand where your brand recognition is weak and why. To truly increase brand recognition, you should be prepared to make operational changes as well as marketing changes.

You can gain traction through increased marketing or updated messaging; try adding new tools, adopting new strategies and experimenting with new channels. Create opportunities that will help your audience help you spread the word, providing a geometric return on your investment. 

You have an inherently built-in base of potential advocates in your employees. Fundamentals like this are often overlooked, but employees can be a great resource if you make it easy for them to spread the word. As you leverage your company’s mission, vision and values to talk about important business decisions or cultural choices in your office, employees can refer to this familiar messaging as a way to talk about your company with others. They don’t need to sell anything, just be visible and excited about your company.

To generate positive brand awareness, you need to give before you take. Companies often forget about the opportunity to build brand awareness by doing helpful work for the community and aligning the brand with good causes. Putting structure behind these philanthropic endeavors helps build culture, stronger employee bonds and brand awareness through association.

The assessment process gives you an honest evaluation of your strengths and weaknesses so you can hone in on your true value. The worst thing you can do for your brand is to market a promise that you can’t deliver. Without a discovery phase, how else can you make sure your positioning is going to be on target?

It’s important to benchmark the current state of your brand in order to track its shift and the return on your investment.  Research gives you the ability to monitor quantitative and qualitative results and provides a foundation for your decisions. It removes personal bias and places the focus on real data about your company’s position in the marketplace. The credibility of two hundred responses from employees, clients and customers can help overcome dissenting opinions among the management team. It becomes a catalyst for organizational change.

The discovery phase also accelerates the change management process by building stakeholder engagement and alignment. As you solicit feedback and conduct outreach to key internal stakeholders, clients, and vendors, they begin to take ownership of their stake in your company’s evolution and become champions for your brand.

Market conditions are always changing: competition enters, technology turns over and new regulations arrive. The strongest companies are always managing their brand in real time. Brand monitoring and management should be a constant endeavor, but it’s especially crucial when considering a brand change.

Content marketing is the creation and distribution of educational and/or entertaining information assets for the purpose of generating brand awareness, traffic, leads and sales. Marketing content is generally free and does not explicitly promote your brand as an ad would.

It is the job of a content strategist to understand the ‘big picture’ business objectives and develop a content plan which meets this.

Once you have a fully researched content calendar which meets the business objectives and includes your keywords, good content marketing includes creating original content which is thought-provoking, memorable and engaging – rich with images and videos.

Email, social media, search and other elements of your digital marketing mix will depend on delivering useful content. Though video outlets, podcasts, and media galleries present other options, a blog is by far the most used tactic for distributing marketing content on a channel over which you have complete control.

The answer to this question depends a lot on your particular audience. What’s engaging to teens will necessarily differ vastly from what middle-aged business professionals will find engaging. Speak to your target audience’s pain points or interests, let them see that you understand them and want to help them – and then open up the conversation. Ask questions, and invite them to respond. The beauty of content marketing, as opposed to traditional marketing, is that communication is not one-way anymore.

Content marketing is the creation and distribution of educational and/or entertaining information assets for the purpose of generating brand awareness, traffic, leads and sales. Marketing content is generally free and does not explicitly promote your brand as an ad would.

It is the job of a content strategist to understand the ‘big picture’ business objectives and develop a content plan which meets this.

Once you have a fully researched content calendar which meets the business objectives and includes your keywords, good content marketing includes creating original content which is thought-provoking, memorable and engaging – rich with images and videos.

Email, social media, search and other elements of your digital marketing mix will depend on delivering useful content. Though video outlets, podcasts, and media galleries present other options, a blog is by far the most used tactic for distributing marketing content on a channel over which you have complete control.

The answer to this question depends a lot on your particular audience. What’s engaging to teens will necessarily differ vastly from what middle-aged business professionals will find engaging. Speak to your target audience’s pain points or interests, let them see that you understand them and want to help them – and then open up the conversation. Ask questions, and invite them to respond. The beauty of content marketing, as opposed to traditional marketing, is that communication is not one-way anymore.

Email is stronger than ever. It’s more popular than any social media. It’s more private. More personal. More reliable. Most people rely on email and check their inbox multiple times each day. If you want to communicate directly with people who actually grant you permission to market to them, email is marketing is essential.

A lead magnet is a free offer you make in exchange for an email address (and possibly additional information). The purpose is to inspire prospects to join your email list by offering something of value. Examples include an ebook, guide, report, assessment, cheat sheet, tool, template, webinar, course, or a coupon.

Websites that go for long periods with no updates and new content are unlikely to perform well or support any useful digital marketing objectives. Though a static website technically qualifies as a website it’s bound to be more than a digital brochure that produces little or no leads.

As often as you can, without getting annoying. How’s that for a vague answer? But it’s true – you want to send frequent emails, but not so frequent that people start unsubscribing or worse, marking them as spam. Where’s the happy medium? Unfortunately, it’s different for each business. For some, once a month is plenty, while for others, daily emails are just fine. Again, it’s a matter of experimentation and testing to see what your particular audience responds best to.

Whether your business is taking advantage of it or not, social media has forever changed the way that consumers communicate with businesses, and vice versa. Being accessible to your customers – and your prospective clients – via social media is a vital means of developing relationships with them and helping them through the sales funnel.

Success is measured using the same metrics you use for any other marketing activity: traffic, leads, and customers. Counting the number of fans or followers you have can help you understand your social media reach, but the bottom line that determines its success is how many people it drives to your site, how many of them are qualified leads, and how many of them actually become customers.

One thing is for certain – social media marketing is never free. Whether you’re spending your own valuable time on it, asking an employee to add it to their workload, hiring a social media employee, or outsourcing to a marketing firm, there is always a cost. The key is to get the maximum ROI out of the time or money you put into it. It’s important to remember, however, that ROI doesn’t have to mean revenue. It can, but it can also mean meeting other objectives, such as getting new leads, increasing email subscriptions, or even boosting customer satisfaction. The ROI you end up with is the direct result of how focused your social media marketing strategy is.

There is no set answer to this question because you need to have a presence wherever your customers are – and different businesses have different audiences. One demographic spends most of their time on Facebook, while another really only engages on LinkedIn, and some divide their time equally between three or more sites. Find out where your customers are, and follow them there.

Whether your business is taking advantage of it or not, social media has forever changed the way that consumers communicate with businesses, and vice versa. Being accessible to your customers – and your prospective clients – via social media is a vital means of developing relationships with them and helping them through the sales funnel.

Success is measured using the same metrics you use for any other marketing activity: traffic, leads, and customers. Counting the number of fans or followers you have can help you understand your social media reach, but the bottom line that determines its success is how many people it drives to your site, how many of them are qualified leads, and how many of them actually become customers.

One thing is for certain – social media marketing is never free. Whether you’re spending your own valuable time on it, asking an employee to add it to their workload, hiring a social media employee, or outsourcing to a marketing firm, there is always a cost. The key is to get the maximum ROI out of the time or money you put into it. It’s important to remember, however, that ROI doesn’t have to mean revenue. It can, but it can also mean meeting other objectives, such as getting new leads, increasing email subscriptions, or even boosting customer satisfaction. The ROI you end up with is the direct result of how focused your social media marketing strategy is.

There is no set answer to this question because you need to have a presence wherever your customers are – and different businesses have different audiences. One demographic spends most of their time on Facebook, while another really only engages on LinkedIn, and some divide their time equally between three or more sites. Find out where your customers are, and follow them there.

Lead nurturing is marketing to prospects—usually via email—to move them further “down the funnel” and keep them involved and engaged with your brand. Consistently interacting at key points during the sales process will inevitably improve conversion rates and drive sales.

Whatever the size of your business it is important that you have a marketing strategy in place, to make sure that whatever marketing activity you do, it is aligned with your goals and objectives. Having a strategy means you have clear steps to take to meet your objectives whether they are short term, mid-term or long term.

 

It gives you a clear plan to stick to and something to measure against your results. If you have a plan in place to meet a certain objective, and that objective wasn’t met, then the activity would need to be analysed to make sure it was the right one for that objective.

It is the job of a content strategist to understand the ‘big picture’ business objectives and develop a content plan which meets this.

Once you have a fully researched content calendar which meets the business objectives and includes your keywords, good content marketing includes creating original content which is thought-provoking, memorable and engaging – rich with images and videos.

Search engine optimization (SEO) is the process of using onsite and offsite tactics to help get content presented by a search engine. Done well, the practice increases the quantity and quality of your traffic.

The main elements of a marketing strategy are your target audience, goals and objectives, and the tactics you will employ to actively market to your target audience and achieve your goal KPIs. These three elements are crucial to formulate an effective marketing strategy.

Most marketers in the fresh produce industry focus on PR during the good times (new products, promotions, etc.) or in times of crisis (food recalls, lawsuits, etc.). What we don’t consider is that this only contributes to a fraction of the total PR needs and opportunities.

The saying is tried and true – “PR is a marathon, not a sprint,” which means there is a lot of work behind the scenes before you see a win. Let’s say you have a major announcement that needs to be told to trade media but you haven’t done any of the PR groundwork beforehand. When the time comes, who is writing your press release? Who will you be sending the release out to? Will they publish the release? At Atelier Clout, our public relations team does the groundwork for you – we write press releases daily and distribute them to our list of over 250 trade media contacts to make sure our clients see the “win.”  

For one of our clients, we created a graph of just what it took to see the results we experienced in 2020. We didn’t just snap our fingers and reach 551 placements – we sent over 2,500 media pitches, distributed 42 product requests, sent five wire releases and two media mailer packages.

So why do you need PR? Because you can’t get to the 551 placements by just wishing for them.  

A long-debated question! We believe that both drive one another in different situations. Marketing drives PR strategy when there are set promotions or content that PR is able to support through media awareness. At Atelier Clout there are few marketing plans that PR doesn’t support. We believe combining all components of marketing (influencer partnerships, public relations, social media, etc.) is the best way to see results. PR, on the other hand, can drive marketing strategy by identifying stories and content relevant for pitching and then driving marketing efforts to support promotional elements. 

Most PR is geared towards generating good (and free) publicity in the media. The trick is to write it as a news story, not as an advertisement for your firm. Whether your story is published will depend on how good your press release is:

  1. It must be news. The story must be topical: you have to find a peg to hang the story on. It is not news that you make dog baskets – but it would be if the Palace bought one.
  2. Head it up ‘Press Release’. Find out the name of the journalist responsible for the section you want it to appear in, and address the press release to that individual.
  3. Put a headline to identify the story. Do not waste too much time on dreaming up a winning pun as the sub-editor will always re-write it.
  4. Write for the publication’s readership. Use jargon for the technical press but simplify it for your local paper.
  5. Put the meat of the story in the first sentence to attract the reader (and sub-editor), then develop the story in succeeding paragraphs. Most stories can be told in three to four paragraphs.
  6. Type in double spacing to make it easy to edit.
  7. Use quotes from an identified source to add interest.
  8. Add your contact details, including your out-of-hours contact telephone number.
  9. Include a photo if possible. Put a caption on the back to identify the people portrayed.

Most marketers in the fresh produce industry focus on PR during the good times (new products, promotions, etc.) or in times of crisis (food recalls, lawsuits, etc.). What we don’t consider is that this only contributes to a fraction of the total PR needs and opportunities.

The saying is tried and true – “PR is a marathon, not a sprint,” which means there is a lot of work behind the scenes before you see a win. Let’s say you have a major announcement that needs to be told to trade media but you haven’t done any of the PR groundwork beforehand. When the time comes, who is writing your press release? Who will you be sending the release out to? Will they publish the release? At Atelier Clout, our public relations team does the groundwork for you – we write press releases daily and distribute them to our list of over 250 trade media contacts to make sure our clients see the “win.”  

For one of our clients, we created a graph of just what it took to see the results we experienced in 2020. We didn’t just snap our fingers and reach 551 placements – we sent over 2,500 media pitches, distributed 42 product requests, sent five wire releases and two media mailer packages.

So why do you need PR? Because you can’t get to the 551 placements by just wishing for them.  

A long-debated question! We believe that both drive one another in different situations. Marketing drives PR strategy when there are set promotions or content that PR is able to support through media awareness. At Atelier Clout there are few marketing plans that PR doesn’t support. We believe combining all components of marketing (influencer partnerships, public relations, social media, etc.) is the best way to see results. PR, on the other hand, can drive marketing strategy by identifying stories and content relevant for pitching and then driving marketing efforts to support promotional elements. 

Most PR is geared towards generating good (and free) publicity in the media. The trick is to write it as a news story, not as an advertisement for your firm. Whether your story is published will depend on how good your press release is:

  1. It must be news. The story must be topical: you have to find a peg to hang the story on. It is not news that you make dog baskets – but it would be if the Palace bought one.
  2. Head it up ‘Press Release’. Find out the name of the journalist responsible for the section you want it to appear in, and address the press release to that individual.
  3. Put a headline to identify the story. Do not waste too much time on dreaming up a winning pun as the sub-editor will always re-write it.
  4. Write for the publication’s readership. Use jargon for the technical press but simplify it for your local paper.
  5. Put the meat of the story in the first sentence to attract the reader (and sub-editor), then develop the story in succeeding paragraphs. Most stories can be told in three to four paragraphs.
  6. Type in double spacing to make it easy to edit.
  7. Use quotes from an identified source to add interest.
  8. Add your contact details, including your out-of-hours contact telephone number.
  9. Include a photo if possible. Put a caption on the back to identify the people portrayed.